Biosphere

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  • GCMD Biosphere
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  • Agriculture
  • Biosphere
  • Land Surface
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Abstract from DBPedia
    The biosphere is the global sum of all ecosystems. The two joined words are "bio" and "sphere". It can also be termed as the zone of life on Earth, a closed system (apart from solar and cosmic radiation and heat from the interior of the Earth), and largely self-regulating. By the most general biophysiological definition, the biosphere is the global ecological system integrating all living beings and their relationships, including their interaction with the elements of the lithosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. The biosphere is postulated to have evolved, beginning with a process of biopoesis (life created naturally from non-living matter, such as simple organic compounds) or biogenesis (life created from living matter), at least some 3.5 billion years ago. The earliest evidence for life on Earth includes biogenic graphite found in 3.7 billion-year-old metasedimentary rocks from Western Greenland and microbial mat fossils found in 3.48 billion-year-old sandstone from Western Australia. More recently, in 2015, "remains of biotic life" were found in 4.1 billion-year-old rocks in Western Australia. According to one of the researchers, "If life arose relatively quickly on Earth ... then it could be common in the universe." In a general sense, biospheres are any closed, self-regulating systems containing ecosystems. This includes artificial biospheres such as Biosphere 2 and BIOS-3, and potentially ones on other planets or moons.

    生物圏(せいぶつけん、英: biosphere)とは生物が存在する領域のこと。一般的には、生物が存在するその領域全体および含まれる構成要素(生物・非生物)の相互作用の総体を指す。より狭義の意味に用いて、その空間に含まれる生物(生物相・生物量・生物群集)のみを指すこともある。

    (Source: http://dbpedia.org/resource/Biosphere)

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