Igneous rocks

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  • Igneous Rocks
definition
  • Pertaining to the composition, texture, formation, location, extent, etc. of rocks formed through igneous processes.
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Abstract from DBPedia
    Igneous rock (derived from the Latin word ignis meaning fire) is one of the three main rock types, the others being sedimentary and metamorphic. Igneous rock is formed through the cooling and solidification of magma or lava. Igneous rock may form with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. This magma can be derived from partial melts of existing rocks in either a planet's mantle or crust. Typically, the melting is caused by one or more of three processes: an increase in temperature, a decrease in pressure, or a change in composition.

    火成岩(かせいがん、igneous rock)は、マグマが冷えて固まった岩石(若干の異物を取り込んだものを含む)。 火成岩は大きく分けて、火山岩(マグマが急激に冷えて固まったもの)と深成岩(マグマがゆっくり冷えて固まったもの)の2つに分類される。以前はその中間として半深成岩という分類もあったが、現在では使われない。火山岩と深成岩の分類において重要なのは、冷え固まったスピードであり、どの場所で固まったかは分類に関係しない。 また、SiO2の含有量(重量%)によって、超塩基性岩・塩基性岩・中性岩・酸性岩と分けられる。苦鉄質鉱物(マフィック鉱物)と珪長質鉱物(フェルシック鉱物)の量比により、超苦鉄質岩・苦鉄質岩・中間質岩・珪長質岩と分けられ、色指数により、超優黒質岩・優黒質岩・中色質岩・優白質岩と分けることもある。いずれの境界も、定義により値は異なる。

    (Source: http://dbpedia.org/resource/Igneous_rock)

data publication(s) found by GCMD Science Keywords)
  • Supplementary material to B. Heim et al. (2008): Assembly and concept of a web-based GIS within the paleoclimate project CONTINENT (Lake Baikal, Siberia)

    (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1594/GFZ.SDDB.1202)

  • Geology of the Lake Baikal region

    (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1594/GFZ.SDDB.1211)

  • Lithological map of the Lake Baikal catchment

    (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1594/GFZ.SDDB.1213)

  • Accessory Minerals in Felsic Igneous Rocks - Part 1: Composition of monazite-(Ce), xenotime-(Y) and zircon from the multi-stage, peraluminous two-mica granite massif of Bergen (Erzgebirge−Vogtland metallogenic province, Germany)

    (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5880/GFZ.6.2.2018.001)

  • Accessory Minerals in Felsic Igneous Rocks - Part 2: Composition of monazite-(Ce), xenotime-(Y) and zircon from the multi-stage, strongly peraluminous, P-F-rich Li-mica granite massif of Eibenstock (Erzgebirge−Vogtland metallogenic province, Germany)

    (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5880/GFZ.6.2.2018.002)

  • Accessory Minerals in Felsic Igneous Rocks - Part 3: Composition of monazite-(Ce) from Paleoproterozoic granitoids and gneisses from the Fort McMurray area (Alberta, Canada)

    (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5880/GFZ.6.2.2018.004)

  • Accessory Minerals in Felsic Igneous Rocks - Part 4: Composition of allanite-(Ce), monazite-(Ce), xenotime-(Y) and zircon from the multi-stage, weakly peraluminous F-poor granite massifs of Kirchberg and Niederbobritzsch (Erzgebirge−Vogtland metallogenic province, Germany)

    (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5880/GFZ.4.8.2019.001)

  • Calculation of thermal conductivity of low-porous igneous rocks from modal mineralogy

    (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5880/GFZ.6.2.2018.005)

  • Accessory Minerals in Felsic Igneous Rocks - Part 5: Composition of monazite-(Ce), xenotime-(Y) and zircon from two geochemically distinct occurrences of highly evolved Li-F granite: The Pobershau-Satzung massif and the Seiffen granite (Erzgebirge−Vogtland metallogenic province, Germany)

    (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5880/GFZ.4.8.2019.002)