Wetlands

prefLabel
  • Wetlands
definition
  • Wetlands is a term for a broad group of wet habitats. They are transitional lands between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems where the lands may be permanently or intermittently water covered.
broader
Abstract from DBPedia
    A wetland is a land area that is saturated with water, either permanently or seasonally, such that it takes on the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other land forms or water bodies is the characteristic vegetation of aquatic plants, adapted to the unique hydric soil. Wetlands play a number of roles in the environment, principally water purification, flood control, carbon sink and shoreline stability. Wetlands are also considered the most biologically diverse of all ecosystems, serving as home to a wide range of plant and animal life. Wetlands occur naturally on every continent except Antarctica, the largest including the Amazon River basin, the West Siberian Plain, and the Pantanal in South America. The water found in wetlands can be freshwater, brackish, or saltwater. The main wetland types include swamps, marshes, bogs, and fens; and sub-types include mangrove, carr, pocosin, and varzea. The UN Millennium Ecosystem Assessment determined that environmental degradation is more prominent within wetland systems than any other ecosystem on Earth. International conservation efforts are being used in conjunction with the development of rapid assessment tools to inform people about wetland issues. Constructed wetlands can be used to treat municipal and industrial wastewater as well as stormwater runoff. They may also play a role in water-sensitive urban design.

    湿地(しっち、英語:wetland)は、淡水や海水によって冠水する、あるいは定期的に覆われる低地のことである。生物、特に水生生物やそれを餌とする鳥類の重要な生育・生息場所となる。英語の音写でウェットランドとも呼ばれる。湿地の特徴によって他と区別される地域一帯は、湿地帯(しっちたい)と呼ばれる。

    (Source: http://dbpedia.org/resource/Wetland)

data publication(s) found by GCMD Science Keywords)